Public events


Thousands of events and processions are held each year across the country, from outdoor festivals to protest marches and demonstrations. In some cases, the law requires organisers to notify us in advance. Regardless of the event type, we’d always recommend organisers get in touch with us. From risk assessments to traffic management, find out below how we help in the planning and policing of events and, who to notify if you're organising an event

Processions, Protests and Demonstrations:

Under sections 11(1) and 11(3) of the Public Order Act 1986, you must tell us at least six working days before the procession is due to take place.

Please download, complete the notification form and email to Force Operations and events

On average completion time is 20 minutes.

Please have the following details ready, if possible:

  • date and time of the event
  • event start point and route
  • number of people you think will be at the event
  • your organisation's name and address
  • planned meetings before or after the event
  • names of anyone scheduled to speak
  • links to any publicity material
  • dates when you'll be available to meet us

Static Event in a public place:

Depending on several factors you may not legally have to tell us about a specific event but, we'd like you to let us know. We can give you valuable advice to help you make the most of your event. For instance, we can tell you about any other events, processions or counter-protests being planned for the same area on the same day. To tell us and get this advice, simply complete our quick and simple form and email to Force Operations and events

Average completion time is 20 minutes

Please have the following details ready, if possible:

  • date and time of the event
  • event location

We'll get back to you if we identify possible issues or have further questions.
You may also find our guidance to organisers of public events information useful. Please note, if you plan to use the road for a march or procession, you'll also need to ask permission from the authority responsible for it, usually the council. Please contact them and ask about a temporary traffic order.

If you see police officers during an event or procession, they’ll be performing various functions. These include preventing crime and disorder, preventing breaches of the peace and minimising serious disruption to the wider community. Police officers will talk to organisers before and during the event to achieve this.

Marches and processions

During large marches or protests, officers tend to be posted at key locations. These will often be road junctions and minimising serious disruption. They may also be posted in front of prominent buildings. In situations like this, we’ll sometimes install temporary barriers. This is either to control the flow of people passing by or to prevent vehicles from stopping.

Violence and disorder

Most events and processions take place peacefully, without any danger to the public. However, if there is violence or disorder our officers will intervene to prevent further disruption and make arrests if necessary.

If you witness violence or disruption while at an event, move to a safe distance and tell a police officer as soon as you can.

For all other ways to get in touch, visit our Contact Us page.

Filming at events

Sometimes our officers will film an event or procession taking place. This is to gather intelligence or evidence to help us improve how we police similar events in future. For instance, where there's been violence or disorder we can use the video to find those responsible and make sure they don’t disrupt further events. To help build a case, we may also film general video footage to capture the mood of the crowd.

(Source Met Police)

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